Recent News

Pages

Archives

Archive for November, 2010

« Previous Entries

Anxious wait for injured Leicester City on-loan goalkeeper Chris Kirkland – Leicester Mercury

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Anxious wait for injured Leicester City on-loan goalkeeper Chris Kirkland
Leicester Mercury
Leicester City will find out today the severity of goalkeeper Chris Kirkland's back injury. The keeper, who is on loan at City until January,

Milan Mandaric,Leicester City – Leicester Mercury

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

The Guardian

Milan Mandaric,Leicester City
Leicester Mercury
Milan Mandaric has revealed he has made a significant loss on his investment in Leicester City. Mandaric, who officially stood down as City chairman
Time is right to leave Leicester City – Milan MandaricBBC Sport
Milan Mandaric bows out of Leicester City proud that his work is doneLeicester Mercury
Mandaric steps down as Leicester City ChairmanFootball Trade Directory
Telegraph.co.uk –GiveMeFootball.com
all 405 news articles »

Andy King gives Leicester City deserved victory over Nottingham Forest – Leicester Mercury

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

The Guardian

Andy King gives Leicester City deserved victory over Nottingham Forest
Leicester Mercury
Andy King reigned supreme for Leicester City once more as his strike gave Sven-Goran Eriksson's side bragging rights over their East Midlands
Leicester City 1 Nottm Forest 0The Sun
Leicester City 1 Nottingham Forest 0: match reportTelegraph.co.uk
Andy King fires Leicester City to victory over Nottingham ForestThe Guardian
World Cup News –bettor.com (blog) –This is Nottingham
all 186 news articles »

Investigation after fire in Leicester city centre – Leicester Mercury

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Investigation after fire in Leicester city centre
Leicester Mercury
Five crews from central, eastern and western stations were called to the former All Saints brewery, in Highcross Street, at about 8.50pm, yesterday.

Milan Mandaric looks back on his ‘special years’ as chairman of Leicester City

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Rob Tanner: Why leave now?

Milan Mandaric: I thought this was probably a good time to make this deal. I had been talking to these people for some time and it didn’t happen over night.

I started to talk sometime in June. That prompted me to say, “well this is my time to step aside”. I can look back and say I have done it my way.

There are some things I could have done better, but I can say I am happy with what I have done here. I am leaving the club in good shape with tremendous, quality and classy people in charge.

Then I saw a club (Sheffield Wednesday) that desperately needs my energy and enthusiasm, experience and money. To turn that club around will be a huge challenge.

That time will come for me again to leave and I will say what I told people when I arrived here; I will leave the club in good shape when I go away.

I really believe this club is now ready to go to the Premier League. The owners asked me to stay and experience something that I have started, but I feel the time is right to move on.

RT: Did you make a profit on Leicester City?

MM: It hurts me when people talk about money. I can tell you this; yes, I sold it for £40 million, but people forget that it cost me £25 million to get into this club and then I spent £26 million. That is £51 million, so you tell me, where’s the other £11 million? But it is not the money. I will probably get some bonus when they go to the Premier, but that will never reach what I spent.

It is not the money and there was no financial incentive to sell the club, because I was making profit. It was the opposite to that. You sell the club when it is the right time and when you have the right people to buy the club. That is what happened.

I lost money and I am not proud of that, because I am a good businessman. But the club’s situation means a lot.

You don’t have to be a brain surgeon to work out this club needs a minimum of £5 to 6 million a year, times four years. It is easy to calculate.

Plus, we have the £18 million for the stadium, plus the debt I had to attend to and put in cash straight away. I never talk about numbers and this is the first time I have talked about numbers to put the record straight.

RT: How do you perceive yourself, as a businessman who can make money out of football, or a football supporter who wants to work in the football business?

MM: I see myself as a man who loves the game tremendously, who works hard to turn around clubs and build success. I also want to be the man who doesn’t lose the money. This is the first time I have lost money in football.

I don’t like to lose money but it wasn’t the most crucial thing. Yes, I love the game and I want to support the game and, above everything else, I want to do what is best for the club, any club I own.

I have owned a lot of clubs and I haven’t left any club in a worse shape. I leave them all in better shape than when I took over.

I have lost money, but I have gained experience and satisfaction. I am going to another club now, but I am not going to change the style of my leadership or my enthusiasm. I am going there with a lot of energy and enthusiasm, because I know I am needed. I am not sure I was needed here any more.

RT: What would you consider your greatest achievements?

MM: In this time of financial turbulence in the football business, I am pleased that I have left the club solid financially, with solid management on and off the field, and left a club that is going nowhere but forward. That is a good achievement.

RT: Do you feel you have had the appreciation for your efforts?

MM: I must say, the supporters are lovely people but I have to be honest, not as much (appreciation) as I thought I should for what I have done. I am a quiet man and I don’t tell everyone what I am doing. I knew what I am doing. But overall from the supporters, I am happy with what I have done.

I was criticised when I waved to the Portsmouth fans, but what was I supposed to do? I had to acknowledge them. I was there seven years.

One day I will come back here and if I get the acknowledgement what do you think I am going to do?

I have enjoyed my four years here, they have been special years. I have always said I would rather live as a lion for four days than like a sheep for 400 years. That is how I have lived.

RT: You had a lot of managers during your time. Any regrets?

MM: People have accused me of firing managers, but if I made a mistake, it was not firing them, it was hiring them. When I fire them I am trying to correct a mistake. I don’t like firing managers. I have people who have worked for me for over 30 years in America.

When I hired Nigel Pearson. people were asking who he was, but he is a great man, a great football man and a great manager. He has done unbelievably well and I am very proud of what he achieved.

RT: What does the future hold for City?

MM: We have a world-class manager who knows football inside and out in Sven-Goran Eriksson. If he can’t get the club to the Premier League then no one can.

Especially with the support of these owners, because they are good people. They have become good friends as well because they think like me.

They are not people who hesitate to put their hands in their pocket to support the club or manager. I think this club has a bright future and I am so happy. That is the main reason I am stepping aside.

RT: What do you think your legacy will be?

MM: I have stabilised the club financially, we have a top manager in Sven-Goran Eriksson, and top-notch owners. We also have good people working here who love this club. I am leaving this club in good hands.

Great night to be a Blue Army member as City get the better of Forest

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

First it was Derby, and now Nottingham Forest. One thing is for sure, Sven-Goran Eriksson knows a thing or two about beating the local rivals.

When Eriksson was at Manchester City, his team twice beat Manchester United in the same season and now he is working his same magic at Leicester – and don’t the Blue Army love him for it.

Andy King set the Walkers Stadium alight with the game’s only goal and the home fans were in a delirious state, despite the snow starting to fall towards the end of the game and the doom-mongers predicting a white-out. “Who cares if we get snowed in?” asked one fan.

The victory over Forest was also a fitting farewell for out-going chairman Milan Mandaric as he made his final bow to the home crowd.

He was cheered by all corners of the ground as club ambassador Alan Birchenall led the tributes to the man off to Sheffield Wednesday and then joked: “We’ll be waiting for you in the Premier League but I’m afraid it will be six points for the City.”

Of course, the Blue Army were hoping Mandaric’s exit would be a sideshow to a City win over their East Midlands rivals. And they certainly got their wish. It was a tough one to call beforehand, said the fans.

The Blue Army really saw the best and worst of City against Forest last season because they were hammered at the City Ground and won at a canter in the return.

There was also probably a lot of checking of weather forecasts in the households of City fans.

But the match was never in doubt and the Sky television cameras even gave their viewers an exclusive look at the boiler powering the undersoil heating.

Forest looked the more threatening side in the opening exchanges and there was a lot of anxiety in the Kop as a couple of attempts whistled past the post.

There were huge cheers from the Forest contingent of 2,326 as Richie Wellens got a free-kick delivery horribly wrong.

There was a raising of expectations as King was brought down on the edge of the area but Paul Gallagher’s free-kick hit Wes Morgan on the head.

Roman Bednar and Curtis Davies also had shots cleared out of the penalty area as the Kop found its voice.

“They took a bit of time to get started – a bit like my old car,” said one fan.

City then had cries for a penalty when Wellens went down under a Chris Cohen challenge and the City fans thought their team were going to take the lead until a dramatic goal-line interception.

But City did not have it all their own way as Forest probed menacingly and there was plenty to talk about over the half-time cuppa.

The spotlight was still on Mandaric as he conducted pitchside interviews at the interval.

When the gaze of the cameras returned to the match, the Blue Army gave referee Michael Oliver some fearful stick for failing to give City a penalty when Darius Vassell went down in the penalty area.

The home fans also wanted to see a change in the City team, with calls for Lloyd Dyer to make his bow. But, as it transpired, they did not need Dyer as Vassell made a brilliant burst into the penalty area and his incredibly skilful play got its reward as King, now the true Fox-in-the box, finished off from close range right in front of the joyous Kop.

It was another great moment in a derby game and what proved to be the game’s defining moment. The song playing at the end was “Tonight’s Going To Be A Good Night”.

Spot on with that sentiment.

Anxious wait for injured Leicester City on-loan goalkeeper Chris Kirkland

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Leicester City will find out today the severity of goalkeeper Chris Kirkland’s back injury.

The keeper, who is on loan at City until January, returned to his parent club Wigan Athletic on Sunday after injuring his back in training and underwent a scan late yesterday afternoon.

The Barwell-born keeper has a history of back problems but he has been fully fit so far this season.

He was set to make his City debut last night against Nottingham Forest.

However, the injury setback could threaten his loan spell at the Walkers Stadium.

City manager Sven-Goran Eriksson said: after last night’s 1-0 victory over Forest: “He has some back problems and he went back to Wigan on Sunday and had a scan late on Monday afternoon, so we will only know in the morning the extent.

“I hope it is not serious but we have to wait and see what kind of injury it is.”

I’ve lost millions on Leicester City – Milan Mandaric

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Milan Mandaric has revealed he has made a significant loss on his investment in Leicester City.

Mandaric, who officially stood down as City chairman yesterday, confirmed he sold the club to new owners Asia Football Investments for £40million but he said it did not cover his outlay over the last four years.

Mandaric took over City in February, 2007 and he admits it has been a tough time financially for the club.

He acknowledged that he had sold it for £40m. But he said that it had cost him £25m to get into the club and that he had spent £26m on it. He added: “That is £51m, so you tell me, where’s the other £11m?”

He said: “I will probably get some bonus when they go to the Premier League, but that will never reach what I spent.”

In his last Mercury interview as City chairman, Mandaric said he believed the club was now ready for the Premier League, thanks to the investment from the new owners.

Mandaric also backed manager Sven-Goran Eriksson to get City into the top flight.

“We have a world-class manager who knows football inside and out in Sven-Goran Eriksson and, if he can’t get the club to the Premier League, no-one can,” he said.

“We also have top-notch owners who have demonstrated they are well capable of supporting the club financially.

“I think this club has a bright future, and I am so happy. That is the main reason I am stepping aside. I am leaving the club in good hands.”

« Previous Entries

Leicester City Football Club